An analysis of diamonds in the rough corporate paternalism and african professionalism on the mines

He has been a Fulbright scholar in both Angola and Ghana. The mines were owned and operated by the Diamond Company of Angola, or Diamang, which enjoyed exclusive mining and labor concessions granted by the colonial government.

Diamonds in the Rough: As Cleveland demonstrates at many points, the social, political, and economic realities of Angola make it very different from other places where mining was undertaken in the region, and as such this is a rich addition to the existing literature.

Ohio University Press, You are not currently authenticated. These relationships ensured that desertion rates remained reasonably low, and that workers were constantly replenished through a dual-prong recruitment process of voluntary and contracted labor chapter 3.

Nonetheless, it is an apt one, and Todd Cleveland did well to draw upon it in his analysis of diamond mining in Angola from toand the company, Diamang Companhia de Diamantes de Angola, Diamond Company of Angolathat controlled it.

Those with an interest in diamond mining will take away as much as those reading for information on forced labor or on the interplay between the Portuguese colonial state and concessional companies.

Cleveland gives a rich portrayal of the processes through which individuals became subjects of capitalism. On arrival at Diamang houses were assigned, or more often constructed from mud and sticks, in a manner designed to create relative space and privacy.

Cleveland persuasively argues that laborers on Angolan mines were active participants in shaping the stable conditions that made Diamang profitable, and, ironically, helped further the Portuguese regime in Angola.

Todd Cleveland is an assistant professor of history at the University of Arkansas.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: This disparity between the harshness of the colonial labor regime elsewhere and the relatively agreeable conditions and attendant professionalism of employees at Diamang opens up new ways of thinking about how Africans in colonial contexts engaged with forced labor, mining capital, and ultimately, each other.

Nonetheless, the text also emphasizes the positive gains of engagement with Diamang, whose management appears to have been for the most part committed to the health and happiness of the workforce—even if simply in order to maximize profits.

He is the author of Stones of Contention and Diamonds in the Rough, as well numerous book chapters and articles on the history of diamond mining and on soccer within the former Portuguese empire in Africa.

This allowed the company to grow and remain productive during the turbulence of the early twentieth century, remaining relatively undisturbed by the war for independence that broke out in Laborers typically returned home at the end of their contracts, usually were paid, and sometimes came back to work more chapter 7.

There workers were medically examined, weighed, and prepared for the time they would spend mining—the latter largely through dialogue with others who had already completed contracts and were then returning home.

The answer Cleveland offers is that working at Diamang was one of the few ways in which colonial taxes could be paid, and that the quality of life for workers there was relatively good.

Diamang relied on colonial practices such as shibalo forced labor to provide workers for the mines in the early years, [End Page ] and on relationships with local officials at all levels later on.

Each chapter traces one theme across the decades from toexploring what changed across time and what remained constant.

Jess Auerbach Todd Cleveland. Indeed, Diamang encouraged employees to bring their wives and children, as the latter were essential in the attainment of food security, as well as important for social stability chapters 4, 5, and 6.

View freely available titles: The narrative of the book spirals.Diamonds in the Rough: Corporate Paternalism and African Professionalism on the Mines of Colonial Angola, – by Todd Cleveland (review).

Diamonds in the Rough: Corporate Paternalism and African Professionalism on the Mines of Colonial Angola, (New African Histories) [Todd Cleveland] on mint-body.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Diamonds in the Rough explores the lives of African laborers on Angola’s diamond mines from the commencement of. Todd Cleveland organizes Diamonds in the Rough, his study of labor at Diamang’s diamond mines in the Portuguese colony of Angola from toaround two concepts that sit uncomfortably in the existing historiography on African labor: “corporate paternalism” to which workers responded with “African professionalism.”.

Diamonds in the Rough explores the lives of African laborers on Angola’s diamond mines from the commencement of operations in to the colony’s independence from Portugal in Diamonds in the Rough Corporate Paternalism and African Professionalism on the Mines of Colonial Angola, – An Introduction to.

Diamonds in the Rough explores the lives of African laborers on Angola’s diamond mines from the commencement of operations in to the colony’s independence from Portugal in The mines were owned and operated by the Diamond Company of Angola, or Diamang, which enjoyed exclusive mining /5(2).

Diamonds in the Rough: Corporate Paternalism and African Professionalism on the Mines of Colonial Angola, – Athens: Ohio University Press, xvi + Athens: Ohio University Press, xvi +

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An analysis of diamonds in the rough corporate paternalism and african professionalism on the mines
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